Human Trafficking

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STARS addresses Human Trafficking epidemic

Stop Trafficking and Resist Slavery (STARS)

Stop Trafficking and Resist Slavery (STARS)

 

Women and girls as young as seven sold to brothels. Boys forced to dive into water after pearls without pay, sometimes becoming entangled in fishing nets and drowning. Children compelled to become soldiers.

Human trafficking is a $32 billion global industry involving millions of people worldwide; its victims are mostly children.

Human trafficking is a problem in Guatemala. Human trafficking is a problem in Romania. Human trafficking is a problem in India, Cambodia and Ghana.

Human trafficking is a problem in Kansas.

Since Topeka Center for Peace and Justice first brought this problem to the attention of local citizens two years ago, things have happened quickly. Last year, an independent group, Stop Trafficking and Resist Slavery (STARS) formed to address this problem. Under the leadership of Washburn University professor Sharon Sullivan, the Task Force includes educators, clergy, concerned citizens and local law enforcement officials.

STARS regards their current mission as primarily educational. In an attempt to increase awareness among the citizens of Topeka of the extent of modern slavery and human trafficking, Sullivan and others have given more than half a dozen presentations to churches and local groups. If your church, school or group would like to view of one several documentaries that are available to make arrangements for a presentation, contact the Peace Center, 232-4388, or Sullivan, 670-2246.

BORROW DOCUMENTARY FROM PEACE CENTER

NotMyLife

“Not My Life” is a documentary film about modern-day global human trafficking, which affects millions of children, women, and men throughout the world. The film shows how women and girls as young as 7 years old are forced into prostitution, and how children are compelled to work heavy labor for little or no pay under the harshest conditions.

Topeka Center for Peace and Justice has several copies that churches, groups and individuals can borrow. There is no charge; however, donations are accepted. Call 232-4388 to borrow a copy of this documentary to help us raise awareness of this growing global problem.